Last edited by Gakasa
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

4 edition of The suppression of expansion in heat-cured mortars by fly ash and other additives found in the catalog.

The suppression of expansion in heat-cured mortars by fly ash and other additives

Philip de Sousa Zacarias

The suppression of expansion in heat-cured mortars by fly ash and other additives

by Philip de Sousa Zacarias

  • 213 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by National Library of Canada in Ottawa .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.A.Sc.) -- University of Toronto, 2002.

SeriesCanadian theses = -- Th`eses canadiennes
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination4 microfiches : negative.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21790647M
ISBN 100612688496
OCLC/WorldCa54460810

Fly Ash Australia and Cement Australia with due acknowledgements [19]. [18] The mix design of the paste for isothermal calorimetry is in Table 3. Table 1. Mineral composition of portland cement. Composition C 3 S C 2 S C 3 A C 4 AF SO 3 MgO Free CaO Others Portland Cement minimal minimal Table 2. The mechanical behavior of basaltic volcanic ash (VA) and fly ash (FA) as a cement replacement under elevated temperatures is mainly investigated in the current study. For this, cement content has been partially replaced with and without the presence of electric arc furnace slag (S). Four distinct ranges of temperatures (°C, °C, °C, and °C) were selected, and the.

USB1 US09/, USA USB1 US B1 US B1 US B1 US A US A US A US B1 US B1 US B1 Authority. SOLUTION TO FLY ASH RATIO AND Na 2 SiO 3 TO NaOH RATIO These are the major strength influencing parameters, same as to water cement ratio in cement concrete. most of the researcher suggested the solution to fly ash ratio , and and Na 2 SiO 3 to NaOH Ratio1 to It is depends upon the chemical composition of fly ash, molarity of NaOH.

In this study, 5 types of fly ash were used. As a result, it became clear that the larger the replacement ratio of fly ash, the less the expansion of mortar became. However, the effectiveness of fly ash to suppress the expansion of mortar was different when the chemical composition or physical property of fly ash was different. mortar mixed with such fly ash were higher than the mortar mixed with fly ash ground by a planetary mill. Key words: Fly ash, Vibratory mill, Planetary mill, EMM, Activated material, Concrete 1. Introduction ince the industrialization in the 19th century, energy usage has been sharply increased, and the usage of fos-sil fuels also tends to be.


Share this book
You might also like
Informing policy

Informing policy

Simulation and AI

Simulation and AI

Social Services Committee report.

Social Services Committee report.

story of Gloucestershire.

story of Gloucestershire.

Managing neighbour complaints in social housing

Managing neighbour complaints in social housing

Investigation of Air Mail and Ocean Mail Contracts.

Investigation of Air Mail and Ocean Mail Contracts.

Elijah Jeremiah Phillipss great journey (Uncle Pauls little learning books)

Elijah Jeremiah Phillipss great journey (Uncle Pauls little learning books)

Foundation Spring Box 75.

Foundation Spring Box 75.

The times. A modest ode

The times. A modest ode

Where do women figure?

Where do women figure?

William Christenberry

William Christenberry

Kirill Kondrashin

Kirill Kondrashin

The humble advice of the Assembly of Divines

The humble advice of the Assembly of Divines

Zeami and his theories on nō.

Zeami and his theories on nō.

The suppression of expansion in heat-cured mortars by fly ash and other additives by Philip de Sousa Zacarias Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fig. 7, Fig. 8 show the early age (90 days) and long term ( days) expansion data of heat cured mortars at 85 °C plotted against 2 days mortar strength cured at 20 °C. From the figures it can be said that, increasing the fineness of cement or decreasing the content of SO 3 Cited by: The Effect of the Partial Cement Subst itution with Fly Ash on Delayed Ett ringite Formation in Heat-cured Mortars Vol.

21, No. 4 / May − − changes and damages induced by the pathology. The correlation between cement and fly ash alkalis and expansion is well documented in other resources.

20, [23] [24][25] However, the aim of this model is to elucidate the correlation between. The mortars were heat-cured at early-age, and the tests of expansion, mechanical strength, dynamic elastic modulus, mercury porosity and thermogravimetric analysis were carried on these mortars.

The expansion of the pulverized bottom ash blended mortars were found to be 10% higher than the fly ash control specimens after normalization of the chemical composition. There are many papers published about the usage of fly ash in cement and concrete technology.

Fly ash is considered effectively as a supplementary cementitious material or replacement material with a portion of cement up to 30–40%. But, fly ash has not been considered as an aggregate in mortar and concrete until now. Fig. 2c shows the dynamic modulus changes with time for two mortars made using Clinker No.

5: one for the 5Brm mortar that did not expand and the other for the 5C85 mortar that exhibited the highest expansion of all the mortars examined. For the latter, the percentage reduction in elastic modulus from the peak value reached was almost 40%, the. Request PDF | Potential alkali silica reaction expansion mitigation of ferronickel slag aggregate by fly ash | This study investigates the potential alkali silica reaction (ASR) of ferronickel.

The graphs in Fig. 10, Fig. 11 support each other related to the effect of Fly ash/Slag ratio, so when fly ash content increases the flexural strength decreases. Whereas Fig. 9, Fig. 11 show that water content does not have any noticeable effect on the flexural strength of the mortars.

The energy consumption of the building sector represents ∼42% of global energy consumption (Park et al., ).In some countries, the building sector accounts for ∼45% of the primary energy consumption (Iwaro and Mwasha, ).This energy demand has been increasing at a rate of 18%/year over the last 40 years and could reach ∼58% of total energy consumption by (Nejat.

This research is to study the effect of mortar mixed with shrinkage reducing agent (polyoxyalkylene alkyl ether type), expansive additive (CaO type), and fly ash (hereinafter “SRA,” “EX,” and “FA,” resp.).

Moreover, steam curing was studied to improve the properties of mortar. The plastic shrinkage test was conducted by using the strain gauge embedded at &#x;cm from the.

Effects of the lithium salt were examined in heat-cured mortars and concretes containing one or both damage mechanisms. The mortars and concretes made using reactive and/or non-reactive aggregates were subjected to heat treatment consisting of a hydration delay period of 4 h at 23 °C followed by steam-curing at 95 °C and then stored in limewater.

90 and day curing 87 and % for 5% fly ash mortar (M1). However, these values increased toand for 25% fly ash mortar (M5) with corresponding 7 day curing. Table 2 Compressive and split tensile strength of fly ash mortars investigated Concrete Name FA, % Compressive Strength, N/mm2 Split Tensile Strength, N/mm2.

The admixtures include one class F fly ash, a condensed silica fume, a ground fiberglass, three glass containing waste materials, and two inert fillers (carbon and calcium carbonate).

Mortar bar expansion, the change in evaporable water content, the evidence of reaction and the composition of reaction products were studied. BEHAVIOUR OF MORTAR CONTAINING SIICA FUME AND F ASH 13 BEHAVIOUR OF MORTAR CONTAINING SILICA FUME AND FLY ASH USED FOR FERROCEMENT LAMINATES K.

SASIEKALAA1 AND R. MALATHY 2 1 Department of Civil Engineering, M.A.M. College of Engineering, TrichyIndia. 2 Sri Ganesh College of Engineering, Mettupatti, SalemIndia.

Key words: Compressive strength, Water binder ratio, Mortar. In order to develop high performance cement mortars by the addition of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash stabilized in the form of insoluble carbonates, two different types of standardized mortar specimens of the four referred cements were carried out: a first reference mortar (R) without additions, and a second MSWI fly ash mixed.

influence of cement type, fly ash type, and internal curing on performance. These mortars contained 50 % fly ash by mass replacement for cement (except for the control mixture without fly ash), a water-to-cementitious materials ratio (w/cm) ofand 54 % (siliceous) sand by volume fraction.

between and for other lithium salts and for lithium nitrate, it lies between and [12] Collins, C. L, (), The effects of lithium additives - LiOH, LiCl, and LiNO ₃ on alkali silica reaction were examined at various dosages.

The expansion was below the acceptable limit of % at 56 days. In the past, inorganic sealing materials mainly composed of cement mortar, cement fly ash, cement water glass and other cement-based soft matters were used.

While the cement-based soft matters have a low cost and a wide range of sources, it is easy to precipitate during solidification and the volume shrinkage rate is typically more than 15% [ 78 ].

(without fly ash), and the other mixes contained Class F fly ash obtained from Mettur thermal power plant. In the first three set the mortars were prepared withand binder-to-sand ratio. The fly ash was blended with the mixed cement at replacement ratios.

constant, the fly ash reduced the expansion of the mortar, with very little expansion for the 20% and 30% fly ash mor-tars. In the second series the equivalent alkali content of plain cement mortars was varied from to % by adding potassium sulfate in order to simulate the effect of diluting a high-alkali cement with up to 30% fly ash.

They.Fly ash combined with a bonding agent, an air entrainer, water, and a foaming agent which forms gas as a result of a chemical reaction within the mixture; allowed to foam and harden, produces a material that is relatively strong and light, has good structural strength, and is resistant to fire, freezing, and thermal shock.

Since the major component, fly ash, is a waste product, the material is. BEHAVIOUR OF MORTAR CONTAINING SILICA FUME AND FLY ASH USED FOR FERROCEMENT LAMINATES K. Sasiekalaa 1 and R.

Malathy 2. 1 Department of Civil Engineering, M.A.M. College of Engineering, TrichyIndia. 2 Sri Ganesh College of Engineering, Mettupatti, SalemIndia *Corresponding Author: K.

Sasiekalaa Department of Civil Engineering, M.A.M. .